"Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

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MarkO's picture
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I have been looking for documentation on the "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card.

Is there any Manuals On-Line or Interface References??

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gsmcten's picture
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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

MarkO,

I just finished doing a Google Search for this item and according to a couple of the forums I visited, there were no manuals for this Internet / Printer Card.

That is puzzling to me as every other card out there has some sort of documentation, or software to go with it.

You and Speedy have piqued my interest in the other thread. I keep looking into it.

Steven Smile

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

Hello Mark,
sorry for you but there is not the slightest chance to get documentation.... in fact the card is not realy a "network" Card like you might understand it... in fact it´s just a "multiple serial card" that enables you to use like any other asycronous serial card or like often realized in the mid 80´s by linking one or more apple´s together with modem cards 2400 Bd and exchange data by xmodem or other BBS-Software..... that has nothing to do with TCP/IP and the card was already in the mid 80´s a flop due to fact that cheaper and more robust modem cards had been availiable...

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the second part includes less friends but a lot more joy on life....

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

gsmcten wrote:

MarkO,

I just finished doing a Google Search for this item and according to a couple of the forums I visited, there were no manuals for this Internet / Printer Card.

That is puzzling to me as every other card out there has some sort of documentation, or software to go with it.

I was beginning to wonder if I was not performing a very through search... I am glad to hear that I am not the only one having Documentation Location Issues...

There are 6 for sale on ebay.. They appear to have some sort of DB-25 Daisy-Chain for the Physical Layer, but I was wondering how to write Software to communicate with them... These cards might make a good test interface for development of other network Interfaces... Any long term plans will require older Interfaces made in Large Volumes, or new Hardware..

Quote:

You and Speedy have piqued my interest in the other thread. I keep looking into it.

Steven Smile

I pulled my old 1983 Apple ][e out of Storage and my 100's of Disks, a couple months ago, and even though I have plenty of 5.25" SS/SD and DS/DD disks, I find it a little laborious to connect up ADTpro and send an Image over the Serial Port to a Floppy, so I can try a piece of Software I never used before.... Most of my Apple Software is Pre-ProDOS... If I had no floppies, it would be Harder..

I look at all the options that are currently out there...

The CF Card systems are an excellent idea, but you still need ADTpro, or unmount the CF Card and insert into a Modern Machine to change or Load it..

The few existing Ethernet Interfaces seem to be aimed at Web Surfing, which in 1991, would have been very do-able, but today.... There are Web Pages that just the HTML is 4-5 times the total memory of an Apple ][e, not including the Graphics....

What I see a need for is the Disk-less Workstation. The Apple boots off the Network Disk Server, the Disk Images look like a local FD or HD, but they reside on a Modern Linux, Mac or IBM/PC box.. If you have an Apple Floppy Drive, you can still use it, in conjunction with the Network Boot, if you have Floppies..

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

speedyG wrote:

Hello Mark,
sorry for you but there is not the slightest chance to get documentation.... in fact the card is not realy a "network" Card like you might understand it... in fact it´s just a "multiple serial card" that enables you to use like any other asycronous serial card or like often realized in the mid 80´s by linking one or more apple´s together with modem cards 2400 Bd and exchange data by xmodem or other BBS-Software..... that has nothing to do with TCP/IP and the card was already in the mid 80´s a flop due to fact that cheaper and more robust modem cards had been availiable...

That explains why "Mastery Development" made Printer Interfaces too...

So it uses something like RS-485, which to a Software Interface looks like a RS-232 Serial Interface, but in fact is a Mulit-Node Networking Hardware.

So the ROM on the Card, must Handle the individual Device ID's......

That would actually be very cool.. My day job is Working with RS-485 and CAN Bus networking...

I might make a Bulk Offer for all 6 Cards... Possible Reverse Engineering the concept would be valuable..

In the OLD DAYS, the RS-232 and Modem combination used SLIP or PPP to make a TCP/IP connection over a Serial Port..

One or More of these cards, with another "embedded device" on the network with the WIZ812MJ that could function like a Router.. The WIZ812MJ would have the External IP Address, and a Quasi-TCP/IP for each of the Apple ]['s would communicate with "router"..

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

Another thing to the last posting:
in the older days the BBS-systems did not use anything like that ! The box just had 5 to 7 modems pluged in and each was just attempted by directly calling something similar like a office-phone-box that was able to handle the amout of lines routed by the telephone company to react to one telephone number ! ( i.e.. like nowadays a small office the for example gets 5 lines and 1 main number and the ability to program some 5 to 8 "sub-numbers" and the comunication was handled with xterm or xmodem or proterm...... your explanations target to the early web of the beginning 90´s ... i´m talking about the very beginning of the Arpa-net and the BBS-Systems of the time from 1981 to 1987.... and that had been straight modem to modem connections..... and the bbs-system just switched like a fast chopper between the lines and picked up the stuff in the "cache" of the serial communication of each line and dropped back the reply-stuff in output-port-stack.....
Most of the old BBS-systems did run at an IBM-AT and they where equiped for that purpose with multi-serial-cards that had 4 or 8 serial-ports.... the same technic was used at the wyse-terminals.... and back to your post: in those connections NO SLIP and NO PPP ! AOL and compuserve was several years later... and that was early web with internet explorer and netscape ... this cards are "pre-internet-explorer and pre-netscape and pre-Compuserve and pre-AOL !

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the second part includes less friends but a lot more joy on life....

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

speedyG wrote:

Another thing to the last posting:
in the older days the BBS-systems did not use anything like that ! The box just had 5 to 7 modems pluged in and each was just attempted by directly calling something similar like a office-phone-box that was able to handle the amout of lines routed by the telephone company to react to one telephone number ! ( i.e.. like nowadays a small office the for example gets 5 lines and 1 main number and the ability to program some 5 to 8 "sub-numbers" and the comunication was handled with xterm or xmodem or proterm...... your explanations target to the early web of the beginning 90´s ... i´m talking about the very beginning of the Arpa-net and the BBS-Systems of the time from 1981 to 1987.... and that had been straight modem to modem connections..... and the bbs-system just switched like a fast chopper between the lines and picked up the stuff in the "cache" of the serial communication of each line and dropped back the reply-stuff in output-port-stack.....
Most of the old BBS-systems did run at an IBM-AT and they where equiped for that purpose with multi-serial-cards that had 4 or 8 serial-ports.... the same technic was used at the wyse-terminals.... and back to your post: in those connections NO SLIP and NO PPP ! AOL and compuserve was several years later... and that was early web with internet explorer and netscape ... this cards are "pre-internet-explorer and pre-netscape and pre-Compuserve and pre-AOL !

I remember those days... In APR-1984, I bought a U.S. Robotics, 300/1200 Password Smart Modem. It had a Plastic Case, One LED, mostly Hayes AT command set.. I hooked it to the Apple with a Super Serial Card, and ran some obscure Terminal Program, then later used ASCII Express..

Most BBS's in my area were run Part-Time on C-64 computers, at 300 Baud.. The one 1200 bps system was run on a Northstar Advantage.. WOW.. That was fast.. I logged on to it, just to see how quick the Characters came across the Phone Line.

Did you have CompuServe and AOL over on "that side of the pond"??

If the "Mastery Development" cards are for multiple Modems, that is not very helpful, anymore...

Thanks for the Info.....

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

Hello Mark,
that was just the reason that i mailed the posting to forwarn you, that you probably might get disappointed to your expectations of the cards.... Yep.... we had here over the pond Compuserve beginning at the time somewhere at 1986...

AOL came over the pond nearly 8 years later, when the "browser-wars" between netscape and microsoft had finished and left netscape behind with a "trap-trial" bleeding out at court.... one of those scenes i don´t like Mr. Gates very much for.... he probably should have been sent to jail for the things he did in those days....

- in those days i had quite close connections to the Chaos Computer Club in Germany which was something like the "official hacking scene" in the public - but in fact we just realy were bothered about the weak public security in the systems used in those days...

in those days i developed a external modem with the AMD8910 in the beginning and later that was just upgraded by plugging in the AMD8911 so at the beginning it operated at 300 Bd / 1200 Bd and after the upgrade it handled 1200 Bd / 2400 Bd..... as DIY project it could be built in one afternoon and cost something about 60 Bucks meanwhile the factory-built modems cost at least 150 Bucks in those days... it had the nickname "data-toilet" due to the fact that the rubber-muffs used to plugin the telephone-headset were bought in plumber-supplyshops and were originaly designed to fit between the waterflushbox and the tube running down to the ceramic-seat.....

the university in Munich had a fixed link with the University in Hamburg and the other German Universities and we as students just created local BBS-Systems that again had been linked together with the computer main frame of the university - with the result that we could file-share and chat throughout all german universities... i remember that i spent lot of nights in those days upfront of my Apples or PC´s with a pizza and coke besides.... it was also the time we started to make propaganda for open source and supported the BSD system and i for example developed hardware drivers for the system.... later the war between AT&T started at court with Berkley and the final outcome was, that all the stuff was transfered from Berkley to Helsinki ( because AT&T had no access to the country nor the University over there ) and finally LINUX got "out of the craddle" over there..

In fact the AT&T trial was entirely just a "fake" because we never had used anything from AT&T ... in fact the BSD system had more familiar connection to the UCSD system.... i have both sources entirly in my arcive boxes and therefor know what i´m talking about... at the beginning large parts had been written in Pascal and years later we switched over to C..... i prefered Pascal because it´s better self-documenting and therefor better for working in a community due to the fact that lot of programmers are rather lazy with documentation and later when switching to C that caused desastrous trouble... if you ever have tried to develop at a base of nearly undocumented C codes and sit there for hours waisting your time just because another guy was to lazy to spend some two or three hours for correct documentation of his "brain-output", you know what i´m talking about... in some times of those days i spent more time with disassembling rather that developing... just to get back to an acceptable documentation... thats licking at the lemmon without the tequilla thereafter to get the taste away...

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In early days I had a lot of money but no time - now I have no money but a lot of time....
the second part includes less friends but a lot more joy on life....

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

speedyG wrote:

Hello Mark,
that was just the reason that i mailed the posting to forwarn you, that you probably might get disappointed to your expectations of the cards.... Yep.... we had here over the pond Compuserve beginning at the time somewhere at 1986...

Thanks again, for the Warning... I always perceived Compuserve and AOL as being very U.S. Centric...

Quote:

AOL came over the pond nearly 8 years later, when the "browser-wars" between netscape and microsoft had finished and left netscape behind with a "trap-trial" bleeding out at court.... one of those scenes i don´t like Mr. Gates very much for.... he probably should have been sent to jail for the things he did in those days....

I would have to agree with you... I am a Long Time OS/2 ( eSC ) user, too.. And what Micro-Soft did to the IBM PC Group on the Pre-Loading of Windows 95 was just as Criminal... Micro-Soft, paid for it later, ( in the amount of $813 Million ( USD ) to IBM for Unfair Business Practices, or some such thing ) but the War was lost, and it Took about another 10 years of "Wimpy" Windows, before I ever got a system that could run longer than a week, straight...

Quote:

- in those days i had quite close connections to the Chaos Computer Club in Germany which was something like the "official hacking scene" in the public - but in fact we just realy were bothered about the weak public security in the systems used in those days...

As should anybody that understands how computer data is stored.. Europe seems to have a much better "grasp", overall on Personal Data and who keeps it and how it is secured...

Quote:

in those days i developed a external modem with the AMD8910 in the beginning and later that was just upgraded by plugging in the AMD8911 so at the beginning it operated at 300 Bd / 1200 Bd and after the upgrade it handled 1200 Bd / 2400 Bd..... as DIY project it could be built in one afternoon and cost something about 60 Bucks meanwhile the factory-built modems cost at least 150 Bucks in those days... it had the nickname "data-toilet" due to the fact that the rubber-muffs used to plugin the telephone-headset were bought in plumber-supplyshops and were originaly designed to fit between the waterflushbox and the tube running down to the ceramic-seat.....

Ahhh.. The Acoustic-Couple Modems... I have never own one of those or used one, but have seen many pictures... Still a Modem is a Modem, and Great Things can be Done, over the Wires.....

Quote:

the university in Munich had a fixed link with the University in Hamburg and the other German Universities and we as students just created local BBS-Systems that again had been linked together with the computer main frame of the university - with the result that we could file-share and chat throughout all german universities... i remember that i spent lot of nights in those days upfront of my Apples or PC´s with a pizza and coke besides.... it was also the time we started to make propaganda for open source and supported the BSD system and i for example developed hardware drivers for the system.... later the war between AT&T started at court with Berkley and the final outcome was, that all the stuff was transfered from Berkley to Helsinki ( because AT&T had no access to the country nor the University over there ) and finally LINUX got "out of the craddle" over there..

I am sure that AT&T has been kicking themselves over the "Wholesale Licensing" of the UNIX Source Code to Berkley, back in the 1970's.. I think they did that when the Commercial Value of UNIX was not quite realized.. Because after all those Students got to "look at all the Goodies", and then Wrote better replacements, that "some" have since been re-integrated into the UNIX distributions, and even into Linux.. I don't have any BSD Systems running right now, but I really Like OpenBSD for a File/Web Server OS..

Quote:

In fact the AT&T trial was entirely just a "fake" because we never had used anything from AT&T ... in fact the BSD system had more familiar connection to the UCSD system.... i have both sources entirly in my arcive boxes and therefor know what i´m talking about... at the beginning large parts had been written in Pascal and years later we switched over to C..... i prefered Pascal because it´s better self-documenting and therefor better for working in a community due to the fact that lot of programmers are rather lazy with documentation and later when switching to C that caused desastrous trouble... if you ever have tried to develop at a base of nearly undocumented C codes and sit there for hours waisting your time just because another guy was to lazy to spend some two or three hours for correct documentation of his "brain-output", you know what i´m talking about... in some times of those days i spent more time with disassembling rather that developing... just to get back to an acceptable documentation... thats licking at the lemmon without the tequilla thereafter to get the taste away...

I did not work with UCSD Pascal, but the Turbo Pascal on PC did not allow easy access to Low Level data structures, like 'C' or 'C++' does.. I own Turbo Pascal 5.5 for DOS, but have never used it, since I Own Turbo C 1.5, 2.0, BC 2.0, BC 3.1... I prefer to work with 'C', Even thought it is More Dangerous, because it allows More Power and Control at the Hardware Level..

The problem as I see it, is that Programmers treat 'C' ( and 'C++' ) as a High Level Language, when it really is a Low Level Language.. I guess that Assemble Language programmers are forced to be disciplined in their Coding, while 'C' ( and 'C++' ) programmers figure that it is not that Important.

( With Great Power, comes Great Responsibility... )

For those who want to revisit MSDOS programming, Borland has for "Educational Purposes", older Compilers found under the Tools Section at their current Web Site..

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

There is a difference between UCSD Pascal and any other Pascal...
UCSD Pascal is a compiler that run on the Operation System of UCSD which itself is written entirely with Pascal itself too !
i.e.It´s all Pascal from the drivers to the Operation System till up to the Compiler !

its not comparable to Pascal running on CPM or something else....

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

dont know if this is off topic are where i should post it but i have a idea to interfaceing a suoer serial board to a xport tcp brige device thats under 40 dollars something like the xport serial to tcp converter (http://www.gridconnect.com/xportdpnc.html)that acts as a web server if this is not the right thread then what thread do i need; or do i need a new on .
thxs kdhill
have a great day

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

kdhill wrote:

dont know if this is off topic are where i should post it but i have a idea to interfaceing a suoer serial board to a xport tcp brige device thats under 40 dollars something like the xport serial to tcp converter (http://www.gridconnect.com/xportdpnc.html)that acts as a web server if this is not the right thread then what thread do i need; or do i need a new on .
thxs kdhill
have a great day

This sounds like a great addition to the Hardware Developement and special Topics, Thread..

You might want to Post this Topic again, over there....

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

For archive info,
here's some old papers I had,
that relate to the card.

***********************************************************

This Mastery Products Hard Drive
has the Mastery Development software loaded onto it.
It has been Y2K tested,
and has the lifetime activation loaded onto it already.
The software version number is 7.4.

THE PASSWORD IS: FLADS

Please test this out asap.
If there is a problem with it we need to know within 2 weeks.
After June 1st you will not be able to return it to us.

Thank you for you support of Mastery Products LLC

You can reach us by FAX at 425-885-7189.

***********************************************************

LIFETIME ACTIVATION DISK
FOR MASTERY DEVELOPMENT NETWORK
AND TRACKING SYSYTEMS

Enclosed is the LIFETIME ACTIVATION DISK that will permanently activate
your system for as long as you wish to use it. The update procedure is the
same for all systems and is as follows:

- Turn your system on and get it up and running.
- Place the update disk into the drive on your teacher station computer.
- Press "M" and enter the password to get to the teacher's menu.
- Run the "Boot Floppy Disk" option.
- The "Boot Floppy Disk" option will ask you which slot to boot.
Your 5-1/4" floppy drive will probably be connected to slot 6.
Press 6. If your floppy does not boot, turn off the system and check
which slot your floppy disk drive is connected to,
then restart the system and the procedure described above,
pressing the appropriate slot number when asked.
- Once the floppy disk boots the installation program will take over
and display the following message:

Mastery Development's School Network
Software Update Program (c) 1991
Written by Stephen Jensen Rev D.

- Follow the directions on the screen to complete the update.
When finished the screen will display:

System Lifetime Activation Install
Process: completed

- Press any key to restart the network system.

******************************************************

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

Very interesting. Do you happen to have any of the floppies that went with the system?

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

Apologies for the necro of this thread. But I recently came across a teacher version of this card. I took the liberty of dumping the teacher 5.0 rom. I don't see an attach file option here, but if anyone wants to see the dump, let me know.

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

You can get in contact with Antoine Vignau (antoine (AT) brutaldeluxe.fr) of the "Apple II Documentation Project" and send him with a photo of the card as well as the dumped rom.

-Jonas

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Re: "Mastery Development" Apple IIe Network Card

thanks! Will do later today.