recording at 44hz

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hi, i need to record something onto my computer, but it has to be at 44hz. this is a very low frequency, and sound studio will only record at 1khz lowest. what program can i use to accomplish this?

thanks

eric

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Joined: Oct 27 2005
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Re: recording at 44hz

peacefrog226 wrote:

hi, i need to record something onto my computer, but it has to be at 44hz. this is a very low frequency, and sound studio will only record at 1khz lowest. what program can i use to accomplish this?

thanks

eric

why 44hz? are you sure you don't mean 44.1khz? That is what CDs are recorded at.

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I think you're confusing soun

I think you're confusing sound frequency with sampling frequency. 44.1KHz is the standard sampling frequency at which Wave, mp3, AAC and CD audio files are created. Sound Studio lists 1KHz as its minimum sampling frequency because 1KHz as a sampling rate would produce very low-quality files.

If you need to record a source that outputs a 44Hz signal, such as an instrument, you need a microphone and preamp capable of picking up such a low frequency. Assuming you have an appropriate mic and a digital preamp (such as one that connects to the computer via USB), there's no reason Sound Studio couldn't record it.

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because im recording IR so

because im recording IR

so yea it is 44 hz

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You'd be hard pressed to find

You'd be hard pressed to find anything outside of expensive professional equipment that will record effectively at 44Hz.
The Mac's sound hardware is doubtfully up to the task.

You're not doing something with binaural beats, are you? In that case, it's the modulation or "beat" that's 44 Hz, not the sound frequency (which they're using somewhere around a 148 Hz tone - about middle A) (edit 2: Middle A=440 Hz - thanks for the fix, Catmistake)

(edit 1:) Ah, I left this half-finished post open too long and you've explained what you're doing.

Do you actually need to record at that low frequency? If you're recording the IR flashes, which are just on/off pulses, you should be able to translate that into audio pulses at any frequency. I don't see why audio frequency and pulse frequency need to be the same.

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Joined: Sep 3 2004
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ok so heres what im making

ok so heres what im making

i made an IR reciever to record IR rignals from my remote into sound studio

i also made atransmitter to 'play' rhe signals off my computer to operate say my tv.

the reciever recieves fine, but the transmitter dosent work, what am i doing wrong?

here is a picture of my transmitter(right) and reciever(left)

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ok, i dont know how to attach

ok, i dont know how to attach a picture, BUT

i probably dont need to record/transmit at 44 hz

but i do need to know what is wrong with my transmitter what i did was wire a IR emmitting to the positive and negative terminals of a 1/8 inch audio jack(like headphones). same thing for the reciever, but the reciever works, the transmitter dosent

does it sound like i made the transmitter correct?

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slight correction

middle A is 440Hz