Server grade UPS at home

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g3head's picture
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So while AF was down I scouted around aat some of my favorite PC graveyards and aisde from a couple half decent IBM P2s and a server that needs some RAM and a *nix compatible SCSI controller I stumbled across a server grade 1800watt UPS.

I've somehow managed to get it home (150lb monster) but now I'm getting around to the problem of hooking it up. I'm a little unsure of how I should hook it up without blowing something up. I guess the big one is the connector. Would it be safe to change the twist lock (not sure of the name) plug for a nice standard grounded plug? Or would I be better finding the correct socket and wiring it that way?

Here's an eBay auction on an identical UPS:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3085201966&category=20315

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I don't know what you mean by

I don't know what you mean by that connector being a speical twist lock, b ut to me the round plug on the ebay auction link looks like a 220v plug, not a 110 v plug, however the closeup on the voltage sticker shows 110 in. So maybe its just a standard 110 plug with a speical twist lock plug that is 110 volts. Google for info...

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BlackScorpion's picture
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That is a 110 plug but you ne

That is a 110 plug but you need a special outlet or plug adapter, they usually sell them in the pool place. Standard plug on one end and an adapter plug for the special end.

Hope this helps.

Frank

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catmistake's picture
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Hmm... no.

Do you think it would be safe to just wire a washer and dryer to use a standard 110V grounded plug?

You're going to need an electrician.

A good resource for free information (sometimes) could be a local lighting and sound equipment rental company... the first thing to do is identify the plug, then have an electrician wire a new outlet in a convenient place. Make sure the plug fits what they install BEFORE they leave (I've had the wrong outlet installed twice before they got it right).

There seem to be a number of plugs (at least 3 that I know of) that look similar to the one you have there... best to be sure, really sure, before just plugging in adapters.

rael9's picture
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Amperage

The input on that sucker is 22 amps, which is much too high for a standard plug, IIRC. If you have 20 amp service in your house, you might be OK, but I wouldn't chance it.

James M. Baker
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[url=http://rael.webhop.org"]My site[/url]

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Eudimorphodon's picture
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Plug/sockets

http://www.networkcable.com/pages/components/nema_locking.html

What you have there is an "L5-30P".

The equivilant non-locking connectors are detailed here:

http://www.networkcable.com/pages/components/nema_nonlocking.html

It's not uncommon for a house to have a few "5-20R" receptacles, as some larger window air conditioners have the non-locking 20 amp plug. (And the same outlet can also handle "normal" appliances.) But for 30 amps you're probably SOL.

An electrician could probably install one for you, but you'll need all-new wiring all the way back to the breaker panel. (Putting a plug like that in a junction box wired for 15 or 20 amp service could potentially be a serious fire hazard.)

--Peace

martakz's picture
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The circuit brakers would pro

The circuit brakers would probally blow before a fire started.

iMac266 (Strawberry), G3 1400 and the G3 IIsi. I want a Tortoise...

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rael9's picture
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Probably

The probablies get you very time...

James M. Baker
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[url=http://rael.webhop.org"]My site[/url]

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Safety first...

>>>The circuit brakers would probally blow before a fire started.<<<

Where my life and safety are concerned, "probally" (probably?) isn't good enough.

I wanted to re-affirm Eudi's observations about safety...This REQUIRES a licensed electrician for safety reasons and building codes. This is NOT a hack.

That twist lock connector requires a dedicated 120v/30amp circuit breaker, appropriately rated outlet (a matching female twist-lock), AND a heavier gauge wire from the breaker box to the outlet. You can't power any other devices on the same breaker or circuit. And the twist-lock is the only outlet designed to handle that current. To try anything else would create a fire hazard as your household wiring and outlets will not handle the high currents required by this device.

A mid-size UPS and power tools with a 3hp hotor are really the only place you'll see this type of connector...unless you're a touring rock band and need to power-up the amp rack.

tony b.

Tom Waits for no man.

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martakz's picture
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One question...how can it dra

One question...how can it draw so many amps?

Power = Currect X Portential Difference
1800w = A X 120
A = 15amps.

iMac266 (Strawberry), G3 1400 and the G3 IIsi. I want a Tortoise...

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DanR's picture
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Re: One question...how can it dra

martakz wrote:

One question...how can it draw so many amps?

Power = Currect X Portential Difference
1800w = A X 120
A = 15amps.

iMac266 (Strawberry), G3 1400 and the G3 IIsi. I want a Tortoise...

Input: 120VAC 22.0AMP 50/60Hz
Output: 120VAC 20.8AMP 50/60Hz (2500VA / 1800W)

You're looking at the output side, not the input (which is used for charging the batteries).
Watts = Amps x Volts
2496 = 20.8 x 120

I assume the "1800W" is the maximum that it can draw from the batteries when the input is off.

martakz's picture
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Thanks :) iMac266 (Straw

Thanks Smile

iMac266 (Strawberry), G3 1400 and the G3 IIsi. I want a Tortoise...

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30 A

That UPS require 110V 30 amp service. That plug is for a 110V 30 amp socket, which is an industry standard, but not commonly available in houses with 15 amp service. My UPS at work has the same plug and I had to have facilities run a 30 amp circuit to my server rack to run it.

The reason for this is because the battery is SO LARGE that when it's dead, it needs to draw that much current to recharge it within a reasonable amount of time even though 1800 watts is (barely) within the 15 amp limit. If you were running at it's full capacity, there would be no power left to charge the battery.

So, you probably could run it, but after your first power failure it will pop your breaker.

Dr. Bob

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charge

Don't forget that it has to be able to charge the battery packs while running at full load.

Dr. Bob

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Eudimorphodon's picture
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Re: 30 A

drbob wrote:

even though 1800 watts is (barely) within the 15 amp limit. If you were running at it's full capacity, there would be no power left to charge the battery.

So, you probably could run it, but after your first power failure it will pop your breaker.

Another thing to keep in mind:

According to electrical code, the sustained load allowed on an AC circuit is only 80% of the breaker capacity. You really *shouldn't* load a 15 amp circuit with more then 12 amps. Depending on the breaker in your house panel and how well the wiring was done there's still a real possibility of starting an electrical fire due to overload without throwing a breaker.

(And with computer equipment, a 12 amp "running load" can still translate to an overload following a power failure, should all the equipment start up at the same time. Computers tend to draw substantially more power then normal when they're spinning their disks up and whatnot. And of course when a UPS is in the circuit you're going to get the load of the charger kicking in.)

--Peace