??? Trayloader 333 Overclocking ???

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Hello:

After looking over the page located at: http://www.bekkoame.ne.jp/~t-imai/maine.html and reviewing the archives using the term overclocking, I did not feel 100% ready to give it a go ... yet.

Is the information on that page still considered the "newest, latest, best info" on overclocking ???

If I follow the chart correctly, I look at the present CPU speed (333 in my case) on the vertical column, and change the resistors to end up in the configuration noted on that same 333 mhz line.

If I do that modification (successfully) what is the anticipated new cpu clock speed going to be?

Since I have built a few Heathkits many moons ago, working with the resistors is not as much the issue as making sure I understand the steps to follow.

If you have successfully implemented the G3 overclocking on the trayloaders, please pass on any tips on reading that overclocking page note above, and any other information that may be helpful. If the overclocking is only going to incread the cpu speed by 50 or 80 MHZ I may not bother. But then again it may be fun to try just to have done it once, anyway.

Any guidance/tips/pitfalls to be aware of (other than voiding the manufacturer's warranty (Wink would be appreciated.

David Johansson

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David Johansson
DHJ'S LLC
1 person computer services co. in Pryor, OK.
[http://360.yahoo.com/dhjsllc]
G4 AGP 450 Sawtooth
1 Gig Ram 80G HD + Tiger
"Darkside:" Dell Inspiron 9300; 512 RAM, 60 G HD Win XP
Also Trayloader G3-333, EMac-700mhz

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Eudimorphodon's picture
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Re: ??? Trayloader 333 Overclocking ???

dhjsllc wrote:

If I follow the chart correctly, I look at the present CPU speed (333 in my case) on the vertical column, and change the resistors to end up in the configuration noted on that same 333 mhz line.

I'm confused. Are you saying "I look up my CPU speed in the CPU clock column, change the resisters to match that, and my machine is then overclocked."? The way to read the chart is to look up the *desired* cpu speed, and change your resistor configuration to match it. If you have a 333Mhz machine your resistors should already match the 333Mhz line. If they don't, well, obviously the chart shouldn't be trusted. ;^)

As for how much of a speed boost you're likely to get 400Mhz seems to be the highest speed anyone's gotten out of those boards with anything approaching an acceptable level of stability. Your particular machine might not overclock at all, or not go higher then 366Mhz.

This link might be useful should you decide to go through with it:

http://www.macmod.com/content/view/322/2/

It has the same speed table, and describes the actual procedure in some detail. Note carefully the warnings about destroying your computer. There's a genuine possiblity of doing so.

--Peace

dankephoto's picture
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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 1900
worth it

It's such a trivially easy mod IMO it's certainly worth doing for even a 50MHz boost. On my 333 cpu I got a nice stable 400MHz. I haven't tried any higher though, just never got around to it. In my expereince, the G3 processors of that era seem to have a lot of headroom for extra speed.

As for moving resistors, my best advice is to use two irons, that way you can lift both ends at once and avoid the back-and-forth dance (and attendant risks) required with only one iron. Also (I'm sure I don't need to tell YOU, but for others who read this), you must use only grounded (3 wire) irons - ungrounded irons can easily kill such sensitive electronics.

dan k

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DrBunsen's picture
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You can also check out the [u

You can also check out the xlr8yourmac.com database - enter Apple as the CPU brand to see overclocking results.

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Re: worth it

dankephoto wrote:

Also (I'm sure I don't need to tell YOU, but for others who read this), you must use only grounded (3 wire) irons - ungrounded irons can easily kill such sensitive electronics.
dan k

Hate to disappoint ... but I was not aware of the 3 prong iron requirements. I do not own a 3 prong iron now.

That leads to the "flurry of questions:" How to ground the older Radio Shack (Archer) iron with the stock 2 prong cord? Alternatively, where to purchase the 3 prong plug model?

I am inspired to try the overclock process ... but I also am not sure how to increase the cache as noted in posts on the other list referenced above.

Any pointers on increasing the cache?

... Admiting ignorance can be much easier to bear (oops bare!) than recovering from the results of not asking questions first. I appreciate the people on Applefritter sharing their experience and expertise. Thank you.

David Johansson

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David Johansson
DHJ'S LLC
1 person computer services co. in Pryor, OK.
[http://360.yahoo.com/dhjsllc]
G4 AGP 450 Sawtooth
1 Gig Ram 80G HD + Tiger
"Darkside:" Dell Inspiron 9300; 512 RAM, 60 G HD Win XP
Also Trayloader G3-333, EMac-700mhz

DrBunsen's picture
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I just bought a Weller (respe

I just bought a Weller (respected tradesman brand, lots of support, parts etc) grounded, electrostatic discharge safe, RoHS compliant, temperature controlled, multi temp soldering station for $120 Au (about $100 US). If you're planning to work with old equipment of any kind, I highly recommend picking up something like this. There's no way you'll ground an ungrounded iron.

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Soldering Iron Info

DrBunsen:

Thank you for the additional information on soldering irons. I will look into purchasing the 3 prong style iron ... probably the Weller Brand.

In previous eras, we used to use an aligator clip on the diode/transistor leads, and IC sockets for the IC components.

The Times, they are a Changin' ....

David

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David Johansson
DHJ'S LLC
1 person computer services co. in Pryor, OK.
[http://360.yahoo.com/dhjsllc]
G4 AGP 450 Sawtooth
1 Gig Ram 80G HD + Tiger
"Darkside:" Dell Inspiron 9300; 512 RAM, 60 G HD Win XP
Also Trayloader G3-333, EMac-700mhz

Dr. Webster's picture
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Joined: Dec 19 2003
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Re: worth it

dankephoto wrote:

Also (I'm sure I don't need to tell YOU, but for others who read this), you must use only grounded (3 wire) irons - ungrounded irons can easily kill such sensitive electronics.

An old trick to get around this would be to unplug the iron right before you move the resistors. The tip should retain enough heat for the few seconds to melt the solder.

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3 Prong Iron Work around (unplug 2 Prong)

Doc:

Thank you for the work around idea. I may well use that for a while ... and hope I remember whether or not I am plugged in.
(The li'l light on the power strip on/off switch ought to help me remember, though (Wink ...

Maybe I better plug in a radio tuned to an annoying radio station, too. The annoyance may be enough to remind me the iron is still pugged in ... and that I need to flip the switch before using the iron.

Thank you for the low $ method.

David

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David Johansson
DHJ'S LLC
1 person computer services co. in Pryor, OK.
[http://360.yahoo.com/dhjsllc]
G4 AGP 450 Sawtooth
1 Gig Ram 80G HD + Tiger
"Darkside:" Dell Inspiron 9300; 512 RAM, 60 G HD Win XP
Also Trayloader G3-333, EMac-700mhz