Cinema Displays cockeyed

3 replies [Last post]
Eudimorphodon's picture
Offline
Joined: Dec 21 2003
Posts: 1204

I suspect I know the answer to this, but...

So at the office this week I've received desktop computer upgrade consisting of a Mac Pro desktop with a pair of 23" Cinema displays. So far the Mac Pro is still sitting in the middle of my cube, while the monitors are being broken in on my old Dell. (Running Ubuntu. KDE is pretty impressive on a 3840x1200 pixel desktop...)

Anyway, minor annoyance: One of the two monitors (or perhaps both of them) is slightly cockeyed on its stand so the long dimension of the monitor isn't parallel with the desk. You'd never notice it if it were just one monitor, but putting the pair of them side by side means the corner of one screen is about 1/8th of an inch vertically offset from the other. That's *just barely* enough to be annoying. (Apple's famous quality control is of course evident here.)

Is there any hidden adjustment built into these metal stands to correct the side-to-side tilt, or am I just stuck with the fact that someone in Taiwan is sloppy gluing the backs onto these things? :^b

--Peace

P.S. As a side note, is there a good howto out there for installing Linux onto a Mac Pro? I've done the smallest bit of Googling, but haven't come across a well-organized document. There are ones for MacBooks, of course, but many of them seem slightly out of date. I live with MacOS on my laptop, but for the heavy UNIX lifting I expect from my desktop I'm worried all the user interface quirks of trying to mix X11 and MacOS programs will finally drive me batty, and thus I want an out if necessary.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Dr. Webster's picture
Offline
Joined: Dec 19 2003
Posts: 1687
How do the stands attach to t

How do the stands attach to the monitors? Do they mount to the VESA points, or through another bracket? I'd see if I could loosen the screws, align the monitor, then retighten them.

Or just stick a magazine under the base on the high side or something.

For the Linux question, I'd just build a virtual machine under Parallels or something.

__________________

Applefritter Admin

Eudimorphodon's picture
Offline
Joined: Dec 21 2003
Posts: 1204
Re: How do the stands attach to t

Dr. Webster wrote:

How do the stands attach to the monitors? Do they mount to the VESA points, or through another bracket? I'd see if I could loosen the screws, align the monitor, then retighten them.

There also are no meaningful screws on the bracket assembly. The metal stand basically wraps around a peg (A horizontal rod, actually) sticking out of the back of the monitor, and the only "screws" (allen wrench heads) appear to be for adjusting hinge tension or removing the thing entirely. I have a bad feeling the only way to really "fix" it would be to disassemble the monitor entirely to access whatever fasteners hold the peg in place on the inside. (And knowing Apple, it's probably glued in place.)

Quote:

Or just stick a magazine under the base on the high side or something.

My current solution is a folded-up plastic bag. :^b

I suppose I could demand the company order me two VESA mount adapter kits (they screw on the peg in place of the stand) and two adjustable monitor arms. Maybe I can claim I need them for ergonomic reasons... ;^)

Quote:

For the Linux question, I'd just build a virtual machine under Parallels or something.

Yuck. Bigtime.

--Peace

Jon's picture
Jon
Offline
Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 2804
I would think you'd ue BootCa

I would think you'd use BootCamp to make free space on the drive and then use an EFI/GPT aware distro to install with. Of course if you're going to blow away OS X anyway, just go straight for the EFI/GPT distro. It may be that with the newer Macs that have the BIOS hooks already in the EFI, you may be able to use any regular x86 distro. Of course, me not having anything cool enough to run OS X x86, I can't confirm...

__________________

I am not in this world to live up to other people's expectations, nor do I feel that the world must live up to mine. - Fritz Perls