...and a New Mystic is born!

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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 6

Hi CCers,

Yesterday I received a nice CC in the mail from a LEM swapper. It was nice and clean with an LC 550 LB, PDS card ethernet, 32 megs of RAM, and a 1.2 gb HD for the princely sum of $85 shipped.

Man, I love the swap list. Anyway. I got home from the movies at 9p, before 10p I had a working Mystic with parts from around the house. The software hack was simple! Thank you for the easy to follow docs. I am a bit of a mess with the soldering gun, so the 640x480 mod is not in my future unless I can con a friend of mine to do it for me.

My Mystic is running 7.6.1, appropriate apps. The latest verision of iCab is posting this and it is nice and stable. I cannot keep Netscape 4 from crashing, tho...Any hints on that?

I would like to take the CC apart and paint it black with some of that flat black Krylon plastic paint. I know that the back plastics are easy. What about the face of the CC? Is that hard to remove? Do I have to completely tear the machine down like I would an SE/30?

Is the 800-4-Memory 128 meg simm worth it?

Does anyone have a backplate for sale to fit a Mystic?

Thanks!
Scott Strungis

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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 180
To answer a couple of points:

First, congratulations!

Point one: You really need to remove the CRT to do a decent paint job.

Point two: It's really easy to cut down a 575 back panel with a hand 'pull saw' - one that cuts on the pull stroke. 10 minutes work, max.

Point three: IMHO 68Mb is enough for most things a Mystic can do.

Oooo- that's three points. 50% bonus! Wink

Stuart

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Stuart Bell,
Developer of the PowerCC site a long time ago.

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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 6
I know that the back plastics

I know that the back plastics come off with 4 torx screws. If I understand your post, I have to basically dissassemble the entire CC to get the "face" off to paint it? Or does the face come off easy like the back?

I'll eyeball the 575 backplate next week at work. Maybe I have some tools there that can take care of this.

Scott

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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 180
Paint job

The take-apart - which is necessary to paint the front - isn't as bad as it seems:

0. Turn the CC off, and leave it for a few minutes.

1. Remove the back-bucket.

2. Remove all connections between the analogue board and the CRT assembly.

3. Remove the metal shield around the chassis - assuming it's still in place! Wink

4. Using flat-blade screw drivers, lift the four catches which hold the plastic chassis to the front panel, and separate the chassis from the front panel. Put the chassis to one side.

5. Using a T-15 driver (same as you used to remove the case bucket) unscrew the four screws which secure the CRT assemebly to the face plate.

6. You can now paint the face plate to your heart's content! Note that the 'Color Classic' or 'Colour Classic' or 'Performa 250' badge can be removed before painting, if you want.

Above all, be careful not to knock the back end of the CRT - it's fragile in that area - and the 'nipple' at the end can break off easily.

hth.

Stuart

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Stuart Bell,
Developer of the PowerCC site a long time ago.

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Joined: Dec 19 2003
Posts: 566
pant or molecubond

an alternative to paint would be this stuff:

http://www.bryndana.com/ (link isnt working for me ... the server must be down)
http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/cspages/molecubond.php

seems like an interesting product ... it would give you a hard wearing matte finish that has the texture of the original plastic ... you could also paint all the cables etc with it to get a complete black cc Smile

TOM

Jon's picture
Jon
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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 2804
Looks like they've got the "t

Looks like they've got the "tuner" line available now, in addition to the original colors. The big problem is to pick a good color scheme...

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