newby build reality check

7 replies [Last post]
Offline
Joined: Mar 5 2005
Posts: 3

Hello. I caught the link to the Apple 1 book on Wired's site. I'm a programmer - have built computers, but not from the 'ground up' - and I've a general interest in all things electronic but little experience at the hardware level. I'm just wondering what the reality is time-wise for building a Replica 1 for a novice such as myself. Thanks.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Offline
Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 149
Do you have experience in sol

Do you have experience in soldering? In circut assembly? I think you can buy the board fully assembled..

__________________

"Happiness in life is what is important"
Steve Wozniak
PM 6500 | Apple //e | Apple IIc+ | Apple IIGS | Quadra 950 | Hackint0sh

Offline
Joined: Mar 5 2005
Posts: 3
not yet

Part of my desire to take on this project is to give myself a learning opportunity - which would include soldering & circuit assembly. Buying a fully assembled board would defeat the purpose. I'm planning to read through the Apple 1 replica creation book to get a feel for what's involved, but I thought I'd put it to the experienced first.

take care.

iceandfire's picture
Offline
Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 67
replica Building

I suggest that you read the book, Apple I Replica Creation before you start this project. The book contains many hints, tips and construction ideas that could be very useful to you (or me). I bought my Replica assembled, but I would love to build one as a project. Well, maybe I won't build one, but only because I already have one.

__________________

Larry Nelson

Offline
Joined: Mar 5 2005
Posts: 3
thanks for the tip

Yes, this is my intention - to read through the book and see if it's a project I actually wish to take on or if reading alone will sate my curiosity.

Offline
Joined: Mar 22 2005
Posts: 1
Another newbie wondering

I've been a computer junkie since I was born ('86). I have soldering experience, and have built many (PC Based) systems. However I have never actually truly put together a computer from scratch. This Replica 1 Kit is very fascinating to me. How difficult is it? And how about programming? I used to know my way around QBASIC, but other than that have little experience.

Any Help?

Tom Owad's picture
Offline
Joined: Dec 16 2003
Posts: 2460
The book is intended te be ac

The book is intended te be accessible to somebody with a level of experience such as yours. Chapter 4 is a detailed guide to building the eplica I kit. Given your experience, you're probably best off following that chapter as you build. (Once you've learned more, you may want to go back and have your own board fabricated.)

If you've already programmed in QBASIC, you'll be able to wiz through the BASIC chapter. The chapter on assembly will be more challenging, but it is intended for people with no experience programming assembly.

If you run into trouble, you're always welcome to ask for help.

__________________

Admin

iceandfire's picture
Offline
Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 67
Building the Replica -- and programming

While I haven't built a Replica, and my construction techniques are, to say the least, rusty, IMHO the Replica Kit would be quite doable for someone with basic electronic skills. Tom's book has a lot of good techniques and hints to help anyone keep their sanity whle building it, and Vince and everyone on this forum seems to be very willing to help anyone with questions. My advise-- go for it!

As for programming, Apple BASIC is fairly simple and if you've used QBASIC you will pick it up easily. I've adapted a floating point BASIC to the Replica which is much closer to QBASIC, if that's what you want to use. The fun of the Replica is that it lets you wear the builder, programmer and user hats all at the same time.

After learning to use the BASIC programming, you might even want to try the real manly task of writing in assembly! Or Fig-Forth!

__________________

Larry Nelson