Eliminating Dual Startup

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Joined: Mar 12 2005
Posts: 117

So, I'm tired of turning on my Color Classic twice.

The obvious fix to this is to always leave the power switch in the back always on. Is there any reason not to always leave the switch on? It seems to just sit there doing nothing until I push the soft power switch ... is it actually powering anything that could harm the CC if always left on, or even consuming electricity unnecessarily?

The next fix requires a small hack. I was reading about bypassing the soft power function when using an iMac logic board by permanently grounding the power switch thus creating a retro-Compact Mac power-on solution: flip the switch, the Mac starts. While the old-school approach to this fix appeals to me, it may be an unnecessary hack if there's no problem with leaving the power always on and using soft-power only. It occurs to me that the two stage approach to power might be designed to step up voltages and warm things up, preparing for soft-power on. Or Apple was just using training wheels designed to ease people into using soft-power with an unnecessary two step process turning it on the old way and the new (seems unlikely).

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tmtomh's picture
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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 568
Pros and Cons

Normally folks leave the rear power switch on. AFAIK leaving it off will drain the PRAM battery faster. I could be mistaken about this, but AFAIK having the switch off eliminates even trickle power from the AC cord.

Leaving the switch on does consume some electricity, but very little - the analog circuitry and PSU are off. As noted above, I think the only power is the 5V trickle.

As for hacking the power-on mechanism, I don't think it's necessary, for the reasons stated above. However, if you're using a keyboard without a power-on key (like a wireless ADB kb), or if you want a keyboard-less application, an easy - and reversible - way to bypass the power-on mechanism would be to cut up an ADB cable. Plug one end into the CC's ADB port, and on the other end solder together the two relevant wires to create a permanent short. Then you can use the rear power switch to turn the unit on and off.

Matt

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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 354
power consumption

Quote:

Leaving the switch on does consume some electricity, but very little - the analog circuitry and PSU are off. As noted above, I think the only power is the 5V trickle.

As is often the case, the old forum has relevant information. I think Eight watts seems like a lot, compared to a normal computer when idle (a beige g3 draws 2-4 when off but plugged in IIRC).

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grannysmith's picture
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Joined: Dec 20 2003
Posts: 178
[quote]So, I'm tired of turni

Quote:

So, I'm tired of turning on my Color Classic twice.

The obvious fix to this is to always leave the power switch in the back always on. Is there any reason not to always leave the switch on? It seems to just sit there doing nothing until I push the soft power switch ... is it actually powering anything that could harm the CC if always left on, or even consuming electricity unnecessarily?

Almost exactly two years ago I posted that a newly-received CC in P250's clothing, despite an immediate new backup battery, had declined obdurately to start up. It flashed green; it clunked as if a relay were pulled-in; but no startee. After some ten hours on the umbilical cord to the live mains, however, with the rear rocker switch on, it booted completely at first touch of the soft-power switch. The behaviour was repeated shortly after in the case of another poster to the forum, to whom I had recommended an all-day soak with the mains connected through the rocker switch as a potential remedy. Neither of two other (all right, a P250 and a CC) machines had exhibited the like behaviour, and each was also fitted, upon receipt, with a new backup battery as a matter of course. Until I see a schematic of the analogue board I shall not know whether there is an electronic relay at the mains entry, but some such seemed to be more suspicionable than the backup battery, and its circuitry to need some trickle current. The G3 beige is not dissimilar in its requirements.

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