Stereo receiver cuts off

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Stereo receiver cuts off

My stereo reciver cuts off every time I turn the volume up to about 40-45. Why is thiis happening? What can I do to stop it?

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check for blow speakers or sh

check for blown speakers or shorts in the wiring. you may find a driver in a cabinet is blown but the other drivers still work. use a digital multimeter, check the impeadence of each driver or speaker box. it should be in the range of 6 - 8 ohms depending on the speaker. if its 4 ohms or lower it could be the wrong kind of speaker in the enclosure or a blown driver. hope that helps

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Stereo receiver cuts off

I don't think it's the speakers. I was told that it might be my subwoofer over heating and that might be why my receiver is cutting off when I turn the volume up. Is there something I can do about that?

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if there is a short in the wi

if there is a short in the wires leading from your head unit to your speaker cabinet what you describe is what happens when you turn up the volume.

if i cross the wires on my house stereo and i turn it up it trips a breaker (in the head unit) to keep it from hurting itself.

i would trace all of your speaker wire to make sure there is no bare spots in them or none that is shorting out.

another thing to look at is there is a crossover inside every speaker cabinet ( some higher end ones have a safety trip) when things get past the thresh hold of the speaker it trips the fuse shuts them down. i replaced my sub in my cabinet ( before it had a old pair of subs that was close to blowing (but still sounded good) and it fixed my issue) and if i left it at a high volume for to long the crossover would cut off. and would eventually come back on. but a few things can cause this, the trip fuse is weak, or the speakers in the cabinet are gone causing allot of feedback threw the wires causing the trip fuse to cut off

my house stereo has a trip fuse in the head unit ( in case if there is a short in the speaker wires leading to the speaker cabinet) and there is a trip fuse on the crossover in most speaker boxes ( in case if the speaker is feeding back to much power if it is blown or close to being blown, and it trips to keep the speaker from hurting the head unit)

if your speaker cabinet doesn't have a trip fuse in it then its going to rely on the head unit trip fuse to blow

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i think it would be a good id

i think it would be a good idea if we knew exactly what you have for components. the subwoofer wouldnt cause the receiver to shut down unless it was a passive unit IE no built in amplifier and only if there was a problem with the driver or crossover as madmax said.

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Speaker Wire

So do you think it would be a good idea for me to just rewire my speakers. Would that solve the problem?

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at the very least un hook one

at the very least un hook one speaker at a time and turn the volume to the point that it normally shuts down. that might show if you have a bad wire or speaker. proper diagnosis is key here.

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Re: at the very least un hook one

Smiththers wrote:
at the very least un hook one speaker at a time and turn the volume to the point that it normally shuts down. that might show if you have a bad wire or speaker. proper diagnosis is key here.

that and good observation, cant wires eventually go bad and start to feed back the signal to the head unit.

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Re: at the very least un hook one

madmax_2069 wrote:
that and good observation, cant wires eventually go bad and start to feed back the signal to the head unit.

That's why it's always good to check the expiry date on your cables.;)

No, they don't go bad without some external influence such as moisture, rodents, getting stepped on, loose connection, etc.

That said, the first rule of studio troubleshooting (at least where I worked) is to check the cables first. And Smiththers is right on the ball about needing a step-by-step elimination of potential causes.

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Re: at the very least un hook one

eeun wrote:
No, they don't go bad without some external influence such as moisture, rodents, getting stepped on, loose connection, etc.

that was what i was meaning when i said going bad.

also, having low quality wire can hurt sound performance, having a higher grade wire ( like a heavier gauge wire) can help allot then vs thin puny wire.

i had a case of rodents chewing on my wires and i had the same issue, but i took the steps to trouble shoot the problem. the first step was looking over the wires leading to the speaker cabinet, and i found the chewed wire. stupid mouse

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