Happiness is a sharp knife...or two!

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Happiness is a sharp knife...or two!

mmm razor sharp. Never let anyone borrow your knife. It'll always come back with a ding in the blade.

I love the weight and edge on this blade:

Decided to sharpen up my pocket knife while I was at it.

moosemanmoo's picture
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Eek.. I always try to take th

Eek.. I always try to take things apart with knives for some reason and almost always end up nicking a finger. I guess I probably shouldn't do that.

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Nice job but i'm curious, how

Nice job but i'm curious, how does one sharpen a serrated blade? I know the basic steps on using a stone to sharpen a smooth edge, but serrated blades confuse me.

I'm talking about your common kitchen knives and steak knives and so forth.

Reverend Darkness's picture
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Tanto very much....

Sweet tanto... What did you use to sharpen it?

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Why does the serated blade ha

Why does the serated blade have a hole in it?

What purpose does the serations serve?

Why is it in a hook shape?

Looks rather nasty...

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Re: Why does the serated blade ha

martakz wrote:

Why is it in a hook shape?

.
.
The better to gut you with... Wink

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Re: Why does the serated blade ha

martakz wrote:
Why does the serated blade have a hole in it?

What purpose does the serations serve?

If I remember correctly, the hole in the serated blade is to ease cutting through thick, solid items, so as to aid air flow and not create a partial vacuum. At least, that's what I've been told. It's supposed to help immensely with cutting cheese.

As for the serations themselves, they work on the same basis as a saw. The teeth grab into material, therefore making it easier to cut.

Cheers,

The Czar

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Re: Why does the serated blade ha

The Czar wrote:

If I remember correctly, the hole in the serated blade is to ease cutting through thick, solid items, so as to aid air flow and not create a partial vacuum. At least, that's what I've been told. It's supposed to help immensely with cutting cheese.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Ohh god, dude, I'm crying over here.

The hole is a thumb opener that allows me to open it with one hand. Many knives have a nub, but spyderco uses a hole so it's good for righties and lefties.

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Re: Eek.. I always try to take th

moosemanmoo wrote:
Eek.. I always try to take things apart with knives for some reason and almost always end up nicking a finger. I guess I probably shouldn't do that.

Always use the right tool for the job. Knives are for cutting. Not prying.

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Re: Nice job but i'm curious, how

bobotech wrote:
Nice job but i'm curious, how does one sharpen a serrated blade? I know the basic steps on using a stone to sharpen a smooth edge, but serrated blades confuse me.

I'm talking about your common kitchen knives and steak knives and so forth.

Spyderco makes a special stone for that knife that fits inside the grooves. Serrated kitchen knifes are near impossible to sharpen. You can hone the non serrated side a little bit, but you should probably just throw them out. My W├╝sthof knife set includes a serrated blade, but the serrations are the perfect size to fit the included steel.

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Re: Tanto very much....

Reverend Darkness wrote:
Sweet tanto... What did you use to sharpen it?

Great big hard arkansas stone. Patience.

That knife is one of the finest Tanto's ever made. Full tang san mai blade and the pommel is solid brass and fitted directly into the blade. The weight and balance are supurb and the edge retention is fantastic. The only draback is that the blade is so thick that it tends to get stuck in meaty things even though it's hollow ground. However it's heavy enough that the momentum will carry it through a long deep and continuous cut when you really mean it.

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Re: Why does the serated blade ha

martakz wrote:
What purpose does the serations serve?

Why is it in a hook shape?

The serrations are all about concentration of force. The entire shape is razor sharp.

The hook shape is...uhhh...good for...uhh...reaching into things, like...uhhh...cardboard boxes and stuff.

Yep, that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

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