Eprom Burner for Macintoshs

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DoctorClu's picture
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Joined: May 3 2005 - 10:15
Eprom Burner for Macintoshs

I need some suggestions for eprom burners that work with Macintoshs.

I can work with either system 9 or X.

eeun's picture
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Joined: Dec 19 2003 - 17:34
With a quick Google, I can't

With a quick Google, I can't see -any- eprom programmers for Macs. I'm sure there must be some, but you're going to have slim pickings.

Why not grab a dumpstered PC and buy a cheap Willem programmer or roll your own? On the PC side, there's a lot of free/open programming software available.

I got my Willem off ebay for $25, incl. shipping, and it's worked like a trooper.

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Willem

Willem? Have you had luck with those?

eeun's picture
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Yup, it's been fine. I'm not

Yup, it's been fine. I'm not doing high volume stuff...a few PIC chips, and Atari ST TOS roms. For the PIC chips, I ended up using some other program called WinPic instead of the included Willem software. I bought it back in October, and much of my electronics fad has been tamed once I was about half-way through drilling the board holes on these (about half-way down the page for photos).**

You'll find a lot of different variations of the Willem on ebay. I ended up looking for one that did just the chips I needed out of the box. I still had to piece together an adapter for the PIC, though.

** For those interested, the "Eiffel" board is used on the Atari ST computers to convert PS/2 keyboard and mouse signals to the serial signal the ST uses. I etched and built the boards based on the original designer's free drawings.

Jon
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That board won't show the pic

That board won't show the pics without being a registered user.

eeun's picture
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Whoops...apologies. Here's

Whoops...apologies.

Here's the photos (click for larger views):
Eiffel 2
Eiffel 1

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Driving EEPROM Programmer

I did what EEUN suggests when I got my EMP-30 and picked up an old Pentium (just Pentium, as in immediate successor to the 80486) computer.

EEPROM programmer software doesn't really need any horsepower, the real requirement is to have a parallel port, although if you spend bucks (or get lucky) and buy a modern unit, it'll probably have a USB port instead of a parallel port. For example, the EMP-31 is just like the EMP-30 with the same abilities, software, etc., except, it has an USB port.

Anyway, what I'm working around to in my longwinded way is to suggest that you pick up an old PC laptop. That way it won't take up so much darned space. This old Pentium is inconveniently large. The EMP-30 packs away nicely in a laptop case, but the behemoth driving it is always in the way.

I like the Toshiba Satellite T2450 myself; the T2450CT has a nicer screen than the CS model. This is actually a very old 25 or maybe 33 MHz 80486 based machine. However, it is enough horsepower for an EEPROM programmer, provided that you do not need to run Windows 95 or later, and the *real* recommendation, it has a built in SCSI port.

So, it has a parallel port for connecting to the EEPROM programmer, and a SCSI port so that you can store all your firmware files on a drive, e.g. SCSI magneto-optical such as Fujitsu 640MO drive, or ZIP drive, which is compatible with your older Mac.

Of course, you could just get a new enough laptop to have a parallel port and a network port and transfer firmware files via network. But I think that a PC laptop with a built-in SCSI port is *cool*. I don't know of any other PC laptop with that feature.

There were SCSI PCMCIA cards from Adaptec, but getting them to work with the various PCMCIA drivers which shipped with old laptops is a nightmare. The situation for PC Cards on newer laptops is probably better.

Jon
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I've got a stack of old Toshi

I've got a stack of old Toshibas of the 486-586 vintage. Decent machines. I used to have an old Adaptec PCMCIA SCSI card (1460, IIRC) that I just couldn't get to work, so I returned it. I never did like SCSI on about anything that wasn't a PCI card or built-in to a mobo.

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