Identifying a //e Board

10 posts / 0 new
Last post
Offline
Last seen: 2 days 12 hours ago
Joined: Jul 28 2018 - 04:29
Posts: 60
Identifying a //e Board

Hi,

I recently got a Apple //e for my collection. It is a European one (with the switch on the downside of the keyboard).

 

For informtion I looked thru the SAMS Apple //e and I realized that my board is not listed in there.

All boards have the AUX-slot on the left side beneath the PSU. Mine has the AUX-slot directly behind slot 3, so I cannot use this slot anymore when my 80cols/64kb extention card is pluged in. Also slotfinder lists the card as inserted in slot 3.

 

Do I have any special board or is this normal for european systems?

Tom Owad's picture
Offline
Last seen: 16 hours 55 min ago
Joined: Dec 16 2003 - 15:14
Posts: 3112
Photos?

Photos?

Offline
Last seen: 2 days 12 hours ago
Joined: Jul 28 2018 - 04:29
Posts: 60
Here you are: 

Here you are:

 

 

Online
Last seen: 22 min 37 sec ago
Joined: Aug 18 2017 - 16:53
Posts: 135
European systems have the AUX

European systems have the AUX slot near the slot 3. You nearly cannot use the "normal" slot3 except you have a board which is very short.

regards

Ralf

 

Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 41 min ago
Joined: Mar 31 2020 - 19:55
Posts: 800
RalfK wrote:European systems
RalfK wrote:

European systems have the AUX slot near the slot 3. You nearly cannot use the "normal" slot3 except you have a board which is very short.

regards

Ralf

It's a normal PAL //e.

Online
Last seen: 11 min 44 sec ago
Joined: Apr 26 2016 - 08:36
Posts: 80
If you want to use slot 3 in

If you want to use slot 3 in that machine - and I suggest the best thing to plug into slot 3 in a IIe is a FastChip IIe accelerator from a@Heaven.

It could co-exist with a 64K / 80 col card from a newer IIe Platinum or the 8 mB card from Garrett's Workshop. 

 

Both the Fastchip IIe card and the 8MB card are no wider than the slots they occupy.

https://a2heaven.com/webshop/index.php?rt=product/product&path=72&product_id=147

https://www.tindie.com/products/garrettswrkshp/ram2e-ii-gw4203b-8mb-ram-for-apple-iie/

 

 

 

 

 

Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 41 min ago
Joined: Mar 31 2020 - 19:55
Posts: 800
baldrick wrote:If you want to
baldrick wrote:

If you want to use slot 3 in that machine - and I suggest the best thing to plug into slot 3 in a IIe is a FastChip IIe accelerator from a@Heaven.

It could co-exist with a 64K / 80 col card from a newer IIe Platinum or the 8 mB card from Garrett's Workshop. 

 

Both the Fastchip IIe card and the 8MB card are no wider than the slots they occupy.

 

I've thought about buying a fastchip due to the rotary throttle, as it would be useful to tune the speed during operation so that I can speed up waiting tasks, but operate normally at 1 or 2 Mhz, which is something that I cannot do with my ZIP chip. A //e running that fast is mad. I can't imagine that most software is usable at 16Mhz. 

 

 

Online
Last seen: 22 min 37 sec ago
Joined: Aug 18 2017 - 16:53
Posts: 135
Timelord wrote:A //e running
Timelord wrote:
A //e running that fast is mad. I can't imagine that most software is usable at 16Mhz.

 

In 1986 I used to compile some components of the UCSD p-System. The text files of SYSTEM.APPLE are about 300kB and written in NMOS assembler. My first attempts to generate a code file with my original IIe (1.023MHz, 2 Disk II drives, later one Disk II and one Teac 640kB) ran more than 8 hours. Then I bought RAM disks and a Transwarp with 3.6MHz to run this job in about 8min. In 1987 I bought my fast accelerator board running  the CMOS instruction set @12.5MHz. This was a very nice-to-have story to generate new code: about 2:30min. Means from more than 8 hours down to 2 and a half minutes was factor 200!

 

Not mad but very useful :-)

Online
Last seen: 11 min 44 sec ago
Joined: Apr 26 2016 - 08:36
Posts: 80
The Rotary knob speed

The Rotary knob speed adjuster is nice to have, and the nice thing about the FastChip IIe is that you can choose which slots are accelerated and which are not.

This is useful if you have time sensitive hardware like disk controllers or serial cards.

It can also throttle the sound so if you have pokey games you can speed them up  when they're not making any sounds.

There's also a fast/slow button which toggles between your sleected fast speed and normal 1 MHz operation.

 

It also can slow the machine down to like 0.2 MHz if you want to induce pain upon yourself for fun...

 

I thought it was a great investment.  And inexpensive enough to buy two - one for each IIe.

 

Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 41 min ago
Joined: Mar 31 2020 - 19:55
Posts: 800
RalfK wrote:Timelord wrote:A
RalfK wrote:
Timelord wrote:
A //e running that fast is mad. I can't imagine that most software is usable at 16Mhz.

 

In 1986 I used to compile some components of the UCSD p-System. The text files of SYSTEM.APPLE are about 300kB and written in NMOS assembler. My first attempts to generate a code file with my origi

Compilation is one of the specifric reasons that I own accelerators. ;)

 

I used USCD PASCAL in the late 70s through the late 80s. I have thought about doing some stuff with it again, but the filesystem is awful and there are better PASCAL options for most architectures, including the Apple II. I use Lazarus/FPC these days, on modern HW. 

Log in or register to post comments