You cant afford a Smithsonian Apple 1 case fully working? Apple 1 mini Rpi....

35 posts / 0 new
Last post
Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
You cant afford a Smithsonian Apple 1 case fully working? Apple 1 mini Rpi....

You dream a Smithsonian Apple 1 Computer, but you cant afford it because like you know it's a Rare pice of Jobs-Wozniaks's History. I cant give you the solution, but i have little trick:

An Apple 1 Smithsonian Case 3d printable files for Raspberry pi b+ to b3+.

It's born by a my idea and designed by a friend to be printed with your 3d printer.

Here the link to download the STL files:

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3784420

I had to cut from the 3d printed model the two usb backport pegs and the lateral hdmi one to make fit better the raspberry pi and the hdmi cable. Have a try! 

Remember to leave at least a Like!

 

Toolkitman

Tom Owad's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 day 8 hours ago
Joined: Dec 16 2003 - 15:14
Posts: 3008
Can you share some photos of

Can you share some photos of the printed, assembled case?

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
2 hi-res photos of finished prototype

Sure Tom, it's a pleasure!

 

 

And here you can find the Complete Linux Raspbian Distribution, i have built, ready to go in the Raspberry pi b+ or b2 (not b3 or b3+) with the Apple 1 simulator working at startup:

Linux Raspbian Apple 1 Simulator Distro

 

 

 

Thank you for following!

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Cult of Mac Review

Thank you to David Pierini who has made this article on Cult of Mac, link click here: Apple 1 Smithsonian Mini

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Apple 1 Simulator for Apple 2 asimov ftp download link

To simplify the download effort of the whole AONE image for raspberry pi,i have built (That i think it's the best option available), i have added to ASIMOV FTP at this link:

https://mirrors.apple2.org.za/ftp.apple.asimov.net/emulators/apple1/

my simulator, you have only to run it in your linapple raspberry pi application or AppleWin or VirtualII.

There is also a file instruction in the site.

You can use RasAppleII to run the file inside your rpi from here: http://ivanx.com/rasppleii/

 

Enjoy!

 

Matteo T. Toolkitman

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Apple 1 Printing

I was curiouse and i wanted to try an experiment, i have read on the web that with a special interface the Apple 1 was able to print. So why not try with my simulator!?

I have made an experiment with Applewin and my simulator but i think it can work also with Linapple distro i build "AONE".

LOAD the Apple 1 simulator image over Applewin and after pressing R return and * return write 0 300 R to go to Applesoft basic, here write the following commands:

 

POKE 33,33

PR#1

LIST

it will save in the file Printer.txt all the program code and if you write something before the commands in line 2131 and following it will be printed also!

Enjoy your new Apple 1 simulator printer!!!!

 

achimhb's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 6 days ago
Joined: Apr 4 2015 - 19:08
Posts: 70
Sorry, but I have to add a

Sorry, but I have to add a comment. A lot was written about the case. The case was built by Chris Espinosa, not Woz or anyone else.  It was lent to the Smithsonian museum and the museum is NOT the owner! It was only for a short time at display. It is not the “Smithsonian case” etc.

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Great Explanation

Thank you Achim,

for your explanation i think this can help undestand better Apple History,My knowledges are limited about iWoz Book, Steve Jobs 's and Apple II books and manuals and Internet sources that for a born in '76 like me can be difficult to know the real History.

I called it Smithsonian because i saw the photo published in the so named Musuem and i thought it was bought or donated to it.

 

 

Offline
Last seen: 20 hours 34 min ago
Joined: Oct 9 2011 - 12:54
Posts: 1268
One more other tidbit about

One more other tidbit about this one. Last I saw it a few years ago it was locked up in a back room cabinet at the Smithsonian. When I asked a couple of questions of the curator and I was told the case was never opened and they aren’t even sure if there actually is a board inside.

Maybe Achim has more information.

The current Apple-1 on display at the Smithsonian was donated by Lonnie Mimms. It is not in a case and is mounted on a display with other significant artifacts of the 20th century. I have a picture I took back in 2017 of it somewhere. I had a shutter failure on my Nikon on that trip so I don’t recall how good a picture it is though.

Cheers,
Corey

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Would be great to know...

 

Thank you Corey,

it should be great to know if it is a working Apple 1 and so as inside it a real motherboard.

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
 

 

 

Thank you Corey,

it should be great to know if it is a working Apple 1 and so has inside it a real motherboard.

 

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Thank you Corey,

Thank you Corey,

it should be great to know if it is a working Apple 1 and so has inside it a real motherboard.

 

 

 

achimhb's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 6 days ago
Joined: Apr 4 2015 - 19:08
Posts: 70
Toolkitman wrote:

Thank you Corey,

it should be great to know if it is a working Apple 1 and so has inside it a real motherboard.

 

No one knows, if an Apple-1 motherboard is inside. According to my talks to the Smithsonian, they never opened it. Very strange, because for anything on lent there should be a proper documentation. When I gave my Apple-1 to a museum, they made 100+ pictures from any angle.

IF it is still stored in the Smithsonian museum, only the owner could allow to open it. The owner is unknown.

Chris Espinosa told me, that he just built the case. He doesn’t know, if it is empty these days.

I still hope to find the owner one day.

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
if only he/she could read this post

Thank you Achim,

If one day the owner of the case could read this post would be great.

I try to remember that I have read somewhere it was Steve Jobs propriety can it be true?

Offline
Last seen: 20 hours 34 min ago
Joined: Oct 9 2011 - 12:54
Posts: 1268
Toolkitman wrote:

Thank you Achim,

If one day the owner of the case could read this post would be great.

I try to remember that I have read somewhere it was Steve Jobs propriety can it be true?

 

Most likely not, Steve Jobs' personal Apple-1 was left in his office the day he left Apple in 1985.  It is currently at the Living Computer Museum in Seattle.  It is in a metal case. 

 

Cheers,

Corey

achimhb's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 6 days ago
Joined: Apr 4 2015 - 19:08
Posts: 70
Steve Jobs' computer

Indeed. It wasn't Steve Jobs' unit.

It is a really interesting story about Steve Jobs' demo unit. Wendell Sander gave me some information about it.

You may want to read to history: Apple-1 #70.

And here is what is known about the wooden case: Apple-1 #71

Offline
Last seen: 20 hours 34 min ago
Joined: Oct 9 2011 - 12:54
Posts: 1268
achimhb wrote:

Indeed. It wasn't Steve Jobs' unit.

It is a really interesting story about Steve Jobs' demo unit. Wendell Sander gave me some information about it.

You may want to read to history: Apple-1 #70.

And here is what is known about the wooden case: Apple-1 #71

 

OK so it's the "company" Apple-1 that was in his office.  I wonder then if he ever personally owned one since he always moved on to the latest thing.   I had read the entries on the registry before it's just been a while and I should have double checked it first.   

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
I think...

I think everything run around it, now i explain do you see the images in the back is written incomapatible, and i read that this was written because the Apple 1 was not a Personal Computer completly built but you have to buld it by yourself. And if you watch the 2 photos you can see a very rensemblance by the 2 computer Apple 1 and Apple 2 case. I read on google that Steve jobs designed the Apple 2 case.

Can be this all are only rumors only sources i have read.

 

1) Apple 1 with wooden case

https://i1.wp.com/www.mac-history.net/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/apple_i1.jpg?ssl=1

 

2) Apple 2 case

 

http://www.oldgamesitalia.net/sites/default/files/images/articoli/L_Apple_II/OldGamesItalia_Digital_Antiquarian_AppleII_computer.jpg

 

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
by my research...

By my research i have found that incompatible can stay by the way the Apple 1 was not a complete von numann architecture https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Von_Neumann_architecture

Offline
Last seen: 20 hours 34 min ago
Joined: Oct 9 2011 - 12:54
Posts: 1268
Toolkitman wrote:

I read on google that Steve jobs designed the Apple 2 case.

 

I believe that Jerry Manock designed the Apple II case. 

achimhb's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 6 days ago
Joined: Apr 4 2015 - 19:08
Posts: 70
The wooden case made by Chris

The wooden case made by Chris Espinosa has nothing to do with the Apple II case. And well, some computer looked that way. To use cheap and easy to manufacture material for the Apple II was something more or less new.  

 

Steve Jobs did not design any case.

The Apple II case was designed by Jerry Manock himself. I met Jerry a couple of times and he signed Apple II covers for me. 

Jerry owns a unique letter from Steve Jobs. Steve Jobs asked him in the letter to design the case. I had this letter in my hand and it is pretty special. Hint: Take a closer look at the manual calculation done by Steve Jobs. Sorry, I can't publish any picture without his approval. 

But, anyone will see the letter pretty soon. Just have a look the news about "Steve Jobs" +"Jerry Manock" at google.

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Ok i will check Thanks.

Ok i will check Thanks.

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Piel?

Piel?

Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 39 min ago
Joined: Jul 5 2018 - 09:44
Posts: 479
Toolkitman wrote:

By my research i have found that incompatible can stay by the way the Apple 1 was not a complete von numann architecture https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Von_Neumann_architecture

 

In what way do you believe that the Apple 1 is incomplete?  By that definition it is complete, arguably perhaps you need to have the cassette tape interface to have "external storage", but that's the only nit I could see anyone picking.

 

 

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
specifications

I told this because it was written in the image back the Apple 1 in the Smithsonian museum, it was only a suppose but if you check it was sold as a motherboard kit to build also the powersupply was up to build and needed strange ascii keyboard  to load the BASIC software from a cassette so not properly a complete how we call the IBM personal computer of that time. 

And also a monitor was not a plug and play solution.

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
By the way

By the way i love that Green Motherboard with so many history inside, so i built that mini replica...

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
I think you know

I think you know the history but when Steve Jobs meet Paul Terrel at Byte Shop and they took an accord for sale the Apple 1, Paul told Steve that the machine was not a complete personal computer because dosnt had a case a keybaord a power supply and a monitor ready to go, and Steve thought to build the Apple II.

 

Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 39 min ago
Joined: Jul 5 2018 - 09:44
Posts: 479
Toolkitman wrote:

I told this because it was written in the image back the Apple 1 in the Smithsonian museum, it was only a suppose but if you check it was sold as a motherboard kit to build also the powersupply was up to build and needed strange ascii keyboard  to load the BASIC software from a cassette so not properly a complete how we call the IBM personal computer of that time. 

And also a monitor was not a plug and play solution.

 

None of those things make it not a complete Von Neuman architecture.  It was just a kit rather than a pre-built appliance.  By the standards you are talking about things like the Raspberry Pi would not be considered complete, and I think most people would disagree with that.

 

FWIW, the IBM PC was really a relative latecomer.  IBM didn't start shipping PCs until fairly late in the year of 1982.  Apple had been selling complete turm-key personal computer systems for over 4 years by then, as had Commodore and Radio Shack.  And there were numerous other competitors by the time IBM came around.  Atari, TI, etc.  A lot of people who weren't around back then don't know about those or don't remember.

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Von neumann points

These are the Von neumann points to be a complete PC:

 

I think tha point 4 - 5 are not present for default but optional.

 

Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 39 min ago
Joined: Jul 5 2018 - 09:44
Posts: 479
Toolkitman wrote:

These are the Von neumann points to be a complete PC:

 

I think tha point 4 - 5 are not present for default but optional.

 

 

Well, I think you're reading more into it than there is.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Von_Neumann_architecture

 

FWIW, Von Neumann couldn't possibly have imagined a "complete PC" in 1954.  A lot of computers sold today don't include mass storage or keyboards.  The Zotac mini-PC units I use at home come without hard drive, keyboard or mouse (or for that matter RAM).  I don't think anyone would say that those things are "optional" -- facilities are there for them to be connected but the purchaser gets to choose how they want to complete their system.  Same thing with a lot of the Pi type computers.  They come without case, power supply, keyboard or SD card.  The purchaser has to provide them themselves or buy from a vendor who bundles them.

 

But the Apple 1 included the interfaces to accept those devices, just like my Zotac PCs do, so while it may have not been a "complete PC", it was certainly a lot less of a kit than an Altair, etc. , it was at least a complete assembled board.

 

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
A Zotac is a barebone i used

A Zotac is a barebone i used to built more than one : ) nice!

Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 39 min ago
Joined: Jul 5 2018 - 09:44
Posts: 479
Toolkitman wrote:

A Zotac is a barebone i used to built more than one : ) nice!

 

I've got several of them.  Reasonably priced and well engineered.  They run Linux well.  No Windows tax, which I like.

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Just Curious

Just curious, anyone have built successfully my mini Apple 1 replica? Complete with OS or also only the case?

 

Toolkitman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 15 hours ago
Joined: Nov 21 2010 - 15:30
Posts: 204
Find in shop...

Can be of any interest find a product like this fully assembled tested and working and with a warranty that cover the broken of pi in a Apple 1/2 SHOP?

 

cjs
cjs's picture
Online
Last seen: 16 min 2 sec ago
Joined: Mar 4 2020 - 22:20
Posts: 23
Timeline Clarification
Toolkitman wrote:

I told this because it was written in the image back the Apple 1 in the Smithsonian museum, it was only a suppose but if you check it was sold as a motherboard kit to build also the powersupply was up to build and needed strange ascii keyboard  to load the BASIC software from a cassette so not properly a complete how we call the IBM personal computer of that time. 

And also a monitor was not a plug and play solution.

 Actually, most of the Apple 1s were sold by The Byte Shop as completely assembled boards that Jobs and Woz delivered to them. (I don't think that The Byte Shop added cases; they may have added a PSU.) However, various hobbyists did build their own before that.

The ASCII keyboard was not strange at all for the time; it was a fairly well-known and common item  in the hobbyist computer community of the time.

And while the Apple 1 was not "plug and play" like a modern computer is, it was still fairly far ahead of most other microcomputers of the time in having built-in circuitry for generating a video display and reading a keyboard. For other popular computers like the Altair MITS 8800 and IMSAI 8080 you'd have to buy additional interface boards for this and write your own software to handle I/O or, more commonly, spend $500-$1500 on an external terminal or TTY.

There was no "IBM personal computer of that time" (unless you count non-hobbyist machines like the IBM 5100, which cost $11,000 or more); that came six years later. The first series of "plug and play" computers came a year later. The "1977 trinity" was the Apple II (June 1977), the Radio Shack TRS-80 Micro Computer System (Aug. 1977, later retroactively renamed the "TRs-80 Model 1"), and the Commodore PET 2001 (first shown Jan. 1977, but not shipped until Oct. 1977).

Log in or register to post comments